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dc.creatorCARLOS ARREOLA RISA;30085
dc.creatorCARLOS ARREOLA RISA;30085es
dc.date2014
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-18T21:51:02Z
dc.date.available2018-10-18T21:51:02Z
dc.identifier.issn19326203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0091862
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11285/630490
dc.descriptionObjectives: Injury is a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and often disproportionately affects younger, more productive members of society. While many have made the case for improved injury prevention and trauma care, health system development in low- and middle-income countries is often limited by resources. This study aims to determine the economic benefit of improved injury prevention and trauma care in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: This study uses existing data on injury mortality worldwide from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate the number of lives that could be saved if injury mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries could be reduced to rates in high-income countries. Using economic modeling - through the human capital approach and the value of a statistical life approach - the study then demonstrates the associated economic benefit of these lives saved. Results: 88 percent of injury-related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. If injury mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries were reduced to rates in high-income countries, 2,117,500 lives could be saved per year. This would result in between 49 million and 52 million disability adjusted life years averted per year, with discounting and age weighting. Using the human capital approach, the associated economic benefit of reducing mortality rates ranges from $245 to $261 billion with discounting and age weighting. Using the value of a statistical life approach, the benefit is between 758 and 786 billion dollars per year. Conclusions: Reducing injury mortality in low- and middle-income countries could save over 2 million lives per year and provide significant economic benefit globally. Further investments in trauma care and injury prevention are needed. © 2014 Kotagal et al.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.relationhttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84897996367&doi=10.1371%2fjournal.pone.0091862&partnerID=40&md5=07623c2c6e45f693e01957eb84ead708
dc.relationInvestigadores
dc.relationEstudiantes
dc.relation.ispartofREPOSITORIO NACIONAL CONACYT
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
dc.sourcePLoS ONE
dc.subjectaccident prevention
dc.subjectage distribution
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectcause of death
dc.subjecteconomic benefit
dc.subjecthealth care system
dc.subjecthigh income country
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectlow income country
dc.subjectmiddle income country
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectquality adjusted life year
dc.subjectsocial class
dc.subjectsocioeconomics
dc.subjecttraumatology
dc.subjectdeveloping country
dc.subjecteconomics
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectWounds and Injuries
dc.subjectDeveloping Countries
dc.subjectGlobal Health
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectQuality-Adjusted Life Years
dc.subjectWounds and Injuries
dc.subject.classification7 INGENIERÍA Y TECNOLOGÍA
dc.titleHealth and economic benefits of improved injury prevention and trauma care worldwide
dc.typeArtículo
dc.identifier.volume9
dc.identifier.issue3
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-18T21:51:02Z


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